News in brief – Wall on Denmark border, Cleanup of Tesso Nillo, Great Pacific Garbage patch, Columbia highway, Leopards to control Rabies

Wall on the border of Denmark

Denmark is to build a wall/fence along its border with Germany, to stop boar from Germany crossing over as these animals carry an infection called African Swine fever. This is highly contagious and while no cases have been found in Denmark, there is concern that it could threaten the domestic pork industry. Hunters will also be encouraged to hunt wild boar at night Continue reading “News in brief – Wall on Denmark border, Cleanup of Tesso Nillo, Great Pacific Garbage patch, Columbia highway, Leopards to control Rabies”

Predator recovery across Europe – Part 3 – Lynx

The Lynx is thought to number around 10,000 individuals across Europe. There are more smaller populations that have been created following reintroduction programmes so I will not break these down in the same way.

There are two species of lynx within Europe (these are significantly different animals and would likely be incapable of breeding together, unlike for instance Iberian wolves and French wolves). Continue reading “Predator recovery across Europe – Part 3 – Lynx”

Predator recovery across Europe – Part 1 – Wolves

In the United Kingdom it would take an act by humans to reintroduce animals that have become locally extinct. This is due to the English Channel, it is not possible for an animal to wander across the border. In theory wolves and potentially bears are capable of swimming the channel, but Normandy and Brittany are some of the least wild parts of France and so are unlikely to ever have significant populations of the predators. This means that we in the UK have a requirement to decide if we wish to reintroduce predators, which do not exist elsewhere. I have discussed this in depth in other articles. What I wish to talk about here, is the natural spread of predators back across Europe since the 1970 when increasing numbers of people moved to cities, leaving behind spaces to be filled. Continue reading “Predator recovery across Europe – Part 1 – Wolves”

Roads through protected areas

In order to fulfil their purpose of giving a place for large mammals to live naturally, many national parks and nature reserves are very large. Often this is a great draw for tourism, and when done right can create a healthy income for many people living in the area around the park.

However, this area is also a something that often takes a great deal of time to drive around, adding cost for the rest of the economy and so often the road is built across the park. In the short term this can often appear like a good idea, but can have serious problems.

Continue reading “Roads through protected areas”

News in brief – Otters in Peru, Adelie Penguins and Spring in the Arctic

Peru has set up a national park of 868,000 hectares that will protect the areas many animals and native people. This is one of the remaining areas of untouched Amazon within Peru. A recent survey saw showed that this area had a good population of giant otters. This is particularly exciting because, Continue reading “News in brief – Otters in Peru, Adelie Penguins and Spring in the Arctic”

UK extinct species and imported species – Part 2

Grey squirrels- invaders

These animals cause significant damage to woodland throughout the UK. They were first introduced to Henbury park in Cheshire, but have quickly spread. Being less reliant on trees than red squirrels they have done very well though it is thought that red squirrels were not doing well anyway. A great deal of money and time has been spent trying to control their spread, as they often carry squirrel pox which kills red squirrels quickly, meaning they don’t share land for long.

Continue reading “UK extinct species and imported species – Part 2”

UK extinct species and imported species – Part 1

Huge numbers of species have been disappearing from some or all of their original range in the wild. While there are other reasons for animals to disappear from areas, humans are usually the biggest. This is certainly the case on a micro scale. The majority of impacts of climate change has shifted the entire range for a species in one direction or another. Many mountainous species have shifted their range up hill as the planet has warmed. The problem with this shifting is that often it leaves species stuck in small areas of suitable habitat at the top of hills or mountains. Continue reading “UK extinct species and imported species – Part 1”